Saturday morning cartoon: Pooh’s Rabbit

Kenneth Sansom

 

For over a generation, Kenneth Sansom has been the voice of one of America’s most beloved bunnies: Winnie the Pooh’s “Rabbit.”
Ken began acting in the early seventies in an episode of Mayberry R.F.D., a continuation of the Andy Griffith Show. Other roles included The Chipmunks, Maude, Newhart, Charlie’s Angels, and Days of our Lives.  

Rabbit has figured prominently in his career, and it is the role he is known best for.   

So, go fill up your bowl with a sugary cereal, sit on the sofa, and watch a cartoon! (Rabbit appears at about the 1:01 mark in the video below):  

Who was Rabbit? According to Wikipedia:  

Unlike most of the cast in the books, who are based on stuffed animals owned by Christopher Robin Milne, the illustrations of Rabbit look more like a living animal than a stuffed one. This idea is also supported by Rabbit’s own comment to Owl, “You and I have brains. The others have fluff.” In Ernest H. Shepard’s illustrations, Rabbit appears like a typical, long-eared rabbit, except that he walks on two legs and uses his front paws as hands. The top of his head reaches about to Pooh’s nose; his ears, when pointed straight up, reach to just above Pooh’s head. While loyal to the friends he knows, Rabbit shows a certain reluctance to welcome newcomers, as evidenced by his initial negative reaction to the arrival of Kanga and Roo in the first book, and to Tigger in the second book. Nonetheless, he warms up to all of them in time.  

Rabbit likes to take charge and come up with elaborate plans, such as the one to scare Kanga by hiding Roo, and the one to “un-bounce” Tigger. He is also an organizer, as in the case of the Search for Small. As detailed as his plans are, they often miss certain key points, and thus go wrong in one way or another.  

Rabbit tends to include Pooh and Piglet in his plans, and he goes to Owl when there is “thinking to be done”. He sees his relationship to Christopher Robin as being the one that Christopher depends on. Rabbit also has good relationships with the minor animals in the forest, who are usually referred to as his “friends-and-relations”. Several are mentioned by name, including a wasp called Small, a beetle named Alexander Beetle, another member of the beetle family named Henry Rush, and three unspecified creatures called Smallest-of-All, Late, and Early. According to the illustrations of the book, his other friends-and-relations include other rabbits, a squirrel, a hedgehog, some mice, and insects. At one point, Rabbit estimates that he would need “seventeen pockets” if he were going to carry all his family about with him; whether that number refers just to his relatives or to the friends-and-relations as a group is unknown, if it had any basis at all.  

Rabbit lives in a house in the north central part of the Hundred Acre Wood, between the sandy pit where Roo plays and the area where his friends-and-relations live.

More Than 100 Dead Rabbits Found In Clatskanie, OR

 
Yesterday, investigators from the Oregon Humane Society discovered more than 100 dead rabbits at what appeared to be a commercial breeding operation in Clatskanie, a town approximately 60 miles north of Portland.

Investigators seized 33 live rabbits from the rural property and brought them to the OHS shelter in Portland on Friday, August 27th.

The rabbits at the property were breeds typically used for pets and for show.

The rabbits were seized after OHS Investigators and a Columbia County Sheriff Deputy served a search warrant on the property at 78802 Rantala Road in Clatskanie. Columbia County Animal Services aided in the investigation and rescue of the live animals.

The dead rabbits were found concealed in bags buried under a large pile of rabbit feces. The cause of death is still under investigation.  

Public’s Help Sought

The public is urged to call a special Oregon Humane Society tip line if they have any information relating to the identity of the owner. Call (503) 285-7722 ext. 412 to leave any information related to the case.

OHS is searching for the owner of the rabbits, whose identity is not known at this time.

Radical Rabbit Web site

Please note that BNN supports “diplomatic activism” against cruelty to rabbits (or other animals). The views and opinions expressed on Radical Rabbit do not necessarily reflect those of BNN, San Diego House Rabbit Society, or its satellite Lucky Bunny Rabbit Rescue.
______________________________________________________________________________
 

Radical Rabbit is a newly launched Web site. 

 

The site’s “About Us” section says: 

Radical Rabbit was formed by a group of passionate vegan bunny lovers. 

Our aim is to encourage the community to find a new understanding of a very misunderstood creature – the rabbit. 

We feel honoured to have taken on ex factory farm rabbits and are proud to show the community how affectionate and caring these rabbits can be.  We hope that this website helps people understand how many cruel, misleading and unnecessary abuses rabbits face behind closed doors. 

Radical Rabbit members do not believe that any animal should be abused for human use and we have not participated in any illegal removal of animals from private property.  Our group has only taken part in the long term care of rescued rabbits.

Check it out! Danish Rabbit Hopping Championship (2010)

I recently wrote a post about the sport of rabbit jumping, and thought it was very interesting.

Someone sent this video to me today and I thought I’d share it. These rabbits are truly impressive.

Enjoy!

More on rabbits pierced with arrows in Calgary…

OK, as I was searching for an update to the story of the Calgary rabbit pierced by an arrow, I was disturbed to find ANOTHER story about a rabbit in Calgary from May 2010 that had suffered a similar fate!     

What is going on in the Great White North?     

This story was published in the Calgary Sun on May 5, 2010:     

Another arrow-pierced rabbit in Calgary?

Danny Burmeister is used to seeing wild rabbits hopping about his southwest neighbourhood.   

But as he looked outside his Coach Hill home on Sunday evening, he saw something unusual: a brown hare with a long, yellow-feathered arrow pierced completely through its hindquarters.   

“It really pulls at your heartstrings — you’ve got to feel for it,” he said.   “The weird thing is he was really non-chalant and just doing what any normal rabbit would do.”  
Burmeister said its not unusual to see as many as 10-12 rabbits hopping through his neighbourhood near the city’s periphery as they are drawn to apple trees in the area.    

With a collection farms close by, Burmeister said he suspects that someone in the rural area managed to hit the elusive hare but failed to score any vital organs, allowing it to escape with the arrow, that’s longer than its own body, still lodged in it.   

The rabbit, which has several inches of the arrow’s shaft protruding from each side, didn’t hang around long after Burmeister went out to snap some pictures and he hasn’t seen it since.    

“I took a good look around to see if I could find it and get some help but I haven’t seen it again,” he said. 
“Everything is here for a purpose and I don’t like seeing it in pain.”    

A Canada goose pierced by an arrow in 2006 managed to elude capture from would be rescuers on several occasions and was spotted returning to the city’s northeast a year later with the same projectile still lodged in it.    

Can a rabbit can survive after it’s been shot with an arrow? 

Rabbit speared with arrow in Canada

Rabbit speared with arrow in Calgary.

A shocking site for a Calgary woman on her way to work.

Calgary – August 23, 2010.  Gina Rowley spotted a rabbit running through the parking lot of Calgary’s McMahon Stadium with an arrow through its back. The arrow is lodged seemingly just beneath its spine.         

 “I think the people who are doing this should be caught and punished. I think it’s completely disgusting. This is about the fourth case that I know of animals being shot with arrows and I think people should do something about it,” says an outraged Rowley.    

Police were called out and attempted to catch the animal, but came up empty-handed after a 30-minute chase.          

Rabbits frequent the open spaces surrounding the stadium and people are often able to get close to the animals.          

The Calgary Wildlife Rehabilitation Society says that makes them an easy target. The group says it doesn’t have the resources to send someone out to find the rabbit, but if someone catches it, they can bring it in to them or call.    

This incident comes just a couple of weeks after someone shot a dog in Okotoks with an arrow.          

Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) are still trying to find the person responsible in that case.          

BNN will provide updates to this story as they become available.          

To read the original story click here.

Black Market Rabbits Rescued by ‘Bunny Lady’

Reprinted from a post by Lindsay William-Ross
August 21, 2010

Everyday, illegal vendors sell baby animals in the Fashion District, and many sicken and die soon after they’re taken home. But some are rescued by Lejla Hadzimuratovic, founder of Bunny World Foundation, who was recently profiled ABC7

Too young to be sold!

Baby rabbits need to be cared for in their infancy, but are often taken from their mothers too soon to be sold on a black market.

Hadzimuratovic has been nicknamed “The Bunny Lady” because “she’s put her life on hold, taking in some 800 baby bunnies confiscated by police on the streets of L.A. over the past two years.” 

She says the vendors in Downtown L.A. in Santee Alley know her, and they pack up and hide their animals when she comes by with the abc7 film crew. Back at her home, described as “an intensive-care unit of sorts for rescued bunnies,” she tends to dozens of rabbits.     

Rabbits fall victim to the illegal animal trade when they are sold off too young. Often new owners, many of them parents of children who are growing attached to the sick baby pets, are told by veterinarians they will face the loss of their new friend.     

The mission of the BWF is to get the animals rehabilitated and adopted into loving homes. They also hope to educate the public about the perils of the bunny black market.     

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